Shells from Panama

Here are some of the shells we found on the January and February, 2000 trips to Gobernadora Island, taken while the mollusks were still living in a small aquarium. I used an Olympus Camedia model D340R digital camera, which has a zoom feature and later enhanced the photos (taking out distracting backgrounds) in Photoshop.

Newly included are photos of shells from my 2005 trip to the Perlas Islands, taken with a Nikon D100 with 60 mm Micro lens.
 
Conus archon (?)

dredged

 
Conus patricius

collected intertidally on muddy sand bar at low tide

 
Cypraea cervinetta

intertidal, under rocks and crawling between them

 
Ficus ventricosa

intertidal, on sand between rocks

 
Harpa crenata

intertidal, buried in sand at low tide and "popping" when tide turned

 
Jenneria pustulata

Collected under coral rock at 4 feet by snorkeling

 
Murex recurvirostris recurvirostris

dredged, 90 feet on sand bottom

 
Oliva fuscata

dredged at 125 feet on mud bottom

 
Oliva polpasta

dredged, 60 feet on sand bottom; also found intertidally

 
Oliva splendidula

dredged at 90 feet on sand bottom

 
Opeatostoma pseudodon

on rocks uncovered at low tide

 
Pleuroploca princeps

intertidal, on sand between rocks

Note the brilliant red body spotted with deep purple and the sculptured operculum

 
Purpura pansa

on boulders at high tide line

 
Spondylus princeps

chiseled off rock at low tide line

 
Strombus granulatus

dredged at 30 feet on sand bottom

 
Turbo saxosus

under intertidal rocks at low tide

 
Bailya anomala

Intertidal, Perlas Islands. This begins the new section of images from the Perlas Islands.

 
Anachis fluctuata

Intertidal, Perlas Islands

 
Bursa calcipicta

Dredged, 40 feet

 
Bursa calcipicta

Dredged, 40 feet

 
Cassis centriquadrata

Intertidal, Perlas Islands

 
Cypraea cervinetta

Intertidal, Perlas Islands

 
Cypraea cervinetta

Intertidal, Perlas Islands

 
Typhis clarki

Dredged at 40 feet.

 
Typhis clarki

Dredged at 40 feet.

 
Erato scabriuscula

Intertidal under rocks, Perlas Islands

A tiny but exquisite shell

 
Erato scabriuscula

Intertidal under rocks, Perlas Islands

 
Ficus ventricosa

Dredged, Perlas Islands

This juvenile performed energetically as I was photographing it.

 
Aspella indentata

Dredged, Perlas Islands

 
Jenneria pustulata

Under dead coral, Perlas Islands

This shell, though brilliant and beautiful, is difficult to see in its habitat.

 
Jenneria pustulata

Under dead coral, Perlas Islands

 
Jenneria pustulata

Under dead coral, Perlas Islands

The lacy mantle, covered with pustules, adds to the visual confusion.

 
Murexiella lappa

Intertidal under rocks, Perlas Islands

 
Lima pacifica

This bivalve cannot wholly close its shell for the mass of tentacles, which are used to gather tiny plankton from the water for food.

 
Quoyula monodonta

Found on coral, which it eats, this shell is very difficult to see. It's aperture is a lovely purple color.

 
Quoyula monodonta

The shell is difficult to spot on the coral - it nestles close and the shell mimics the coral.

 
Nassarius corpulentis

Dredged, 40 feet

 
Nassarius corpulentis

Dredged, 40 feet

 

A nudibranch, this mollusc has no shells; its gills (branchs) and exposed (nude).

 
Olivella species

Intertidal in sand at the surf line. There are two species here. Note the large foot which helps to burrow quickly.

 
Opeatostoma pseudodon and Leucozonia cerrata

Intertidal rocks. The striped Opeatostoma has a tooth on the outer lip which is used to pry open barnacles to eat.

 
Anachis pardalis

Intertidal in sand among rocks

 
Pecten perulus

Dredged, 40 feet. Note the shining eyes at each "scallop" of the shell. These eyes can detect shadows and possibly movement, to warn of danger.

 
Pecten perulus

Dredged, 40 feet. The animal is extending its foot to orient itself and look for a place to settle.

 
Solen pfeifferi

Dredged, 40 feet. The animal's foot is extended as it looks for sand to burrow in.

 
Cymatium pileare

Intertidal, under rocks. Each "triton" species has a unique spotted pattern on its body.

 
Polinices panamensis

Dredged, 40 feet

 
Polystira pictus

Dredged, 40 feet

 
Oliva porphyria

Intertidal sand at night. This was the prize of the trip, and the group only found two! Three small specimens were dredged as well. This is the largest and one of the most beautiful of the Olive shells. The animal is as beautiful as the shell!

 
Cancellaria pulchra

Dredged, 40 feet. We found several species of Cancellaria.

 
Cancellaria tessellata

This species was found on mud flats during the night low tide.

 
Terebra robusta

Dredged, 40 feet

 
Cypraea robertsi

Intertidal under rocks. The mantle of this animal is thin and inconspicuous, yet it does cover the shell and help disguise it.

 
Cypraea robertsi

 
Cantharus sanguinolentus

Intertidal, under rocks. The species name refers to the blood-red (sanguine) aperture.

 
Cantharus sanguinolentus
 
Prunum sapotilla

Found on the mud flats during the nighttime low tide.

 
Thala solitaria

Dredged, 40 feet. We almost missed this tiny shell in the dredged material.

 
Crassispira turricula

Dredged, 40 feet. Though Turridae don't show much of their bodies when moving about, I like them, so here is one!

 
Zonulispira zonulata

Intertidal. Here's another turrid!

 
Zonulispira zonulata

And another specimen of the lovely turrid above.